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Sunday, December 20, 2009

Putting our money where our mouth is. Literally.

Some of UrbanCincy's friends have written about the need to buy local, and we whole-heartedly agree on the merits. It is proven that spending money at a locally owned business keeps more money in the local economy than spending the same amount at a chain. So when the writers of UrbanCincy try to get together for lunch about once per month to catch up and have an informal staff meeting, we have only 1 rule: buy local.


Our last luncheon adventure took us to Chicago Gyros in Clifton Heights because many of us live nearby. Their generous portions definitely filled us up, and the prices were absolutely reasonable. For the 4 of us, our total bill came to something like $35. Because we bought local, almost $16 stayed in the local economy. Had we spent that same amount at, say, Quiznos across the street (don't get me wrong, I love Quiznos), only about $4.50 would have stayed in the local economy.


Join us in supporting the local economy this holiday season, and all year long, by buying local.


Chicago Gyros on Urbanspoon

12 comments:

Tim said...

love chicago gyros: great food/great prices/great staff

Matt Hunter Ross said...

ditto!

Quim said...

that place kicks butt
the remodeling (demodeling ?) of the exterior is great, too

lightbulbsrwarm said...

Just a pet peeve:

It's in Clifton Heights, not Clifton.

5chw4r7z said...

Where did you get that figure?
I just saw a story on Cooltownstudio.com that said $1 spent locally has a $4 impact on the local economy.

The Provost of Cincinnati, Editor-at-Large said...

If I worked there I'd be fat.

Living in Gin said...

Love that place... When living in Chicago I used to eat at Greektown Gyros all the time, and it's nice to know there's a place just as good in Cincinnati.

David Ben said...

@lightbulbswarm: My fault. I made the correction.

@5chw4r7z: I got that figure for the article that I linked on the word "proven." From what I understand, the difference is that the figures measure two different things: When we buy local, a percentage (and that number is debated) stays in the local economy. The number I used was something like 45%, per the article. That 45% then has the opportunity to travel around the local economy, sometimes being spent locally, sometimes at chains, sometimes leaving the region. The $4 figure you cite is commonly recognized as the total we would obtain if we were to add each fraction of a dollar as it continues to circulate within the economy, getting smaller each time until it reaches something that is close enough to 0 that we can call it 0 (it is asymtotical, so it will never actually reach 0). Said another way, this figure is the point at which the dollar completely diminishes after producing incrementally smaller returns at each transaction. Make sense?

Randy Simes said...

Look at all those khaki pants!

5chw4r7z said...

Thanks David, I'm getting old and my memory is shaky, this is what I was thinking about and I had it wrong. It says Locals have 4x the impact of chains.

Another benefit of shopping locally is someone like Dan from Park+Vine who cares about the community and his customers. You can't put a price tag on that.

Travis Estell said...

Provost:

Please stop pointing out that all of the food I like will make me fat.

Maddie said...

LOVE Chicago Gyros..... remember skipping out of Walnut at lunch to get there and back in the 80's.

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